New Item: VA employee named NCNA Practice Nurse of the Year – Salisbury Post – Salisbury Post

VA employee named NCNA Practice Nurse of the Year

Published 12:00 am Sunday, September 25, 2022

RALEIGH — Nearly 500 registered nurses from across the state gathered in Raleigh on September 15-16 for the North Carolina Nurses Association’s (NCNA) 115th Annual Convention. The event primarily provides an opportunity for professional development, continuing education, and networking, while also serving as a chance to honor nurses and those outside the profession who have made significant impacts on healthcare.

“It seems like every time we get together it gets better. This year, the energy is so high; the engagement, the enthusiasm. It fills my cup meeting new people, seeing them network and connect,” said NCNA President Meka Douthit in a news release. “This is the place where we advocate for education, practice, policy, and so much more. There is something for everybody.”

During the Awards Luncheon, NCNA inducted a past president into its Hall of Fame, named seven award winners, and celebrated the graduation of its 10th Leadership Academy.

Among the honorees is NCNA Practice Nurse of the Year Ladsine Taylor, an NCNA member from Salisbury. As a nurse practitioner at the W.G. Hefner VA Medical Center in Salisbury, Taylor has earned a reputation for being a patient advocate committed to ensuring clinical excellence. In recent years, she has implemented evidence-based programs around fall prevention and gone out of her way to lead interdisciplinary teams designed to help veterans and their families successfully navigate the VA long-term care system. One of the committees she serves on has been credited with implementing policies that assure safe administration of medications. Meanwhile, Taylor has formed life-changing bonds with fellow nurses that she has mentored, demonstrating a positive impact that resonates far beyond the bedside. You can watch her acceptance speech here.

This year’s Convention focused heavily on the state of healthcare in 2022; while society at-large has moved past the coronavirus pandemic, nurses are struggling with serious workforce shortages, burnout, and increasing violence/abuse at the workplace. NCNA’s Statewide Membership Forum, which is designed to help guide the association’s priorities, was dedicated entirely to workplace violence and verbal abuse. Attendees considered the impact these issues have had on their workplace and ways that NCNA can help support a comprehensive culture of safety and zero-tolerance to abuse and violence in healthcare settings.

“Over the past few years, these issues have been getting worse and our members have increasingly been sounding the alarm,” NCNA CEO Tina Gordon said. “Nurses need to be heard and they need to know they’re not alone with their concerns, and I’m glad NCNA was able to support our members by giving them a platform on this incredibly important topic. This conversation gave us critical input we can take to our partners in healthcare systems, at the regulatory level, and in the North Carolina General Assembly to better address these issues.”

Previous Statewide Membership Forums have centered around nurse resiliency and burnout; implicit bias and health inequities; human trafficking; and the opioid epidemic. The Annual Convention typically gives NCNA and its members a chance to prepare for the challenges and opportunities that will shift with the new year, and NCNA feels confident it will continue to gain momentum heading into 2023.

Source: Ross Arrowsmith

New Item: Preventing Suicides in the Health Care Workforce: The Role of Resilience | AHA – American Hospital Association

The COVID-19 pandemic has taken a heavy toll on our health care teams with many suffering from stress, trauma, burnout and increased behavioral health challenges. When physicians, nurses and health care professionals experience extended periods of stress and burnout, they often feel as though they are letting down their patients, their families, and their colleagues. The impact of these prolonged stressors has amplified the need for support and efforts to improve well-being, destigmatize mental health. Continue listening to learn how the Edward-Elmhurst Health’s employee mental health committee works with members across different disciplines and backgrounds to identify and implement strategies to address employee mental health challenges.

In this podcast, Rebecca Chickey, Senior Director, Behavioral Health Services at the AHA, speaks with Gina Sharp, President and Chief Executive Officer, and Lindsey Harrington, Psy.D., Manager, Psychology and Counseling, of NorthShore – Edward-Elmhurst Health in Illinois.

At Edward-Elmhurst Health (EEH), employee mental health and well-being is interwoven into its recruitment and retention strategies. Earning Platinum recognition from Mental Health America’s Bell Seal for Workplace Mental Health, EEH serves as a best-practice example for how to support employee mental health and promote resiliency. In today’s podcast, Ms. Sharp and Dr. Harrington will describe their work to make employees feel safe, included and supported while building organizational resiliency. Moreover, they will share how they use employee feedback on workplace experiences and concerns to provide cutting-edge and empirically supported education and trainings on mental health and workplace violence.


 

Source: Ross Arrowsmith

New Item: Oregon State Hospital issued $54K workplace safety fine – Danbury News Times

Oregon State Hospital issued $54K workplace safety fine

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon State Hospital is facing a $54,000 fine for failing to investigate workplace injuries.

The citation, brought by the state’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, alleges that from January 2021 to June 2022 the hospital didn’t investigate every time workers suffered an injury or illness that caused them to miss work, Oregon Public Broadcasting reported. The hospital didn’t look at ways to prevent future injuries and illness from occurring, according to the citation.

The state hospital is a secure psychiatric facility that largely houses people charged with crimes, but who need mental health treatment before their cases can proceed. In recent years, it has struggled to admit people within the required seven days of being ordered into their care.

Last year, the hospital documented over 300 cases that resulted in thousands of hours away from work, according to the citation. Oregon OSHA also said about 40% of the injury and illness cases in 2022 were the result of workplace violence and most of those cases weren’t investigated.

The Oregon State Hospital, like other hospitals, has struggled with staffing throughout the pandemic. At times, the National Guard has been called in to help.

A unnamed hospital spokesperson says they plan to pay the fine and are working to address the issues.

Source: Ross Arrowsmith

New Item: A global overview of healthcare workers’ turnover intention amid COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review with future directions – Human Resources for Health – Human Resources for Health

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Source: Ross Arrowsmith

New Item: Chair File: Creative Strategies to Strengthen the Health Care Workforce | AHA News – American Hospital Association

When you talk with hospital and health system leaders about their biggest challenges and opportunities, one theme continues to be at the top of their list — workforce. Hospitals and health systems are committed to supporting all health care workers, preparing them for tomorrow and building a pathway for the future.

To support those efforts, the AHA has released a comprehensive guide, “Strengthening the Health Care Workforce.” The guide, which was developed with input from the AHA Board of Trustees’ Task Force on Workforce and many AHA members, contains strategies and resources to assist hospital and health system leaders navigate the ongoing challenges.

The first section of the guide offered strategies and resources to support workforce well-being and behavioral health and prevent workplace violence. The second section focused on data and analytics, as well as technological supports.

The third and final section of the guide was released earlier this month and focuses on strategies and staffing models to support recruitment, retention, diversity, equity and inclusion. We need innovative strategies and solutions to address these issues, and the guide highlights case examples from hospitals and health systems — often working with community partners — that are developing and sustaining a strong health care workforce.

At CommonSpirit Health, the organization I lead, we have just launched an internal nationwide staffing agency and will soon launch a nursing residency program — both to bolster our workforce. The staffing agency will allow nurses to work in 21 states without having to leave the organization, without losing seniority and without being outside the benefit and mission of our health system.

The nursing residency program, a full-year program for graduate nursing students, will enhance their training and education via a curriculum focused on leadership, personal well-being, patient experience and other core areas. The program’s goals include building upon a culture of nursing best practices and increasing workforce satisfaction and retention.

As the AHA guide emphasizes, a talented, qualified, engaged and diverse workforce is at the heart of our nation’s health care system. Understanding the composition and demographics of your organization’s workforce and developing flexible and creative staffing and care delivery models with your clinical teams will be key moving forward.

As part of our multipronged efforts to strengthen the nation’s health care workforce, the AHA will continue to share resources and best practices with the field. We look forward to our continued partnership on this incredibly important work as we strive to create a just society of healthy communities, where all individuals reach their highest potential for health.

Source: Ross Arrowsmith

New Item: Broward County Crime Commission to Host Webinar: Active Shooters Among Us: Are the Solutions that Complex? – TippNews DAILY

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla., Sept. 22, 2022 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) — As part of its Building Bridges Mental Health Conference Series, the Broward County Crime Commission is hosting a preemption and prevention-based webinar to analyze outside the box solutions to stop Active Shooter tragedies. 15 of the most renowned experts in the country are participating.

Photo Caption:  Broward County Crime Commission past panelists.

WHAT: Are the Solutions that Complex: Active Shooters Among Us

WHEN: Wednesday, September 28, 2022

WHERE: ZOOM Webinar Platform

TIME: 7:50 a.m. to Noon EDT

TO REGISTER: http://www.browardcrime.org/

Crime Commission Director/CEO, James DePelisi, was quoted as saying, “These Active Shooter killings are becoming an epidemic of great proportions. If School Districts, Public Safety, and Behavioral Health Specialists work closer together, to implement Intelligence Gathering solutions, these tragedies can certainly be mitigated. But it will require the proverbial Team Effort approach. It is not that complex. To quote Steve Jobs, Let’s Think Different…Together”

Four Tracks on the Day: 3 panels, 1 presentation, and 15 speakers. 

  • Panel I: Artificial Intelligence Concepts and Intelligence Gathering Techniques;
  • Panel II: Root Causes of Active Shooter events.
  • Dual Presentation: How to Talk to Children about Active Shooter Tragedies;
  • Panel III: Survivors from the Highland Park Illinois, July 4th shooting, discuss how they are coping and moving forward. Hear their stories.

TO REGISTER: www.BrowardCrime.org

SEE FULL AGENDA WITH PARTICIPANTS AND TIMES BELOW: 

7:50 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.

Opening Comments, James DePelisi, Broward County Crime Commission

8:00 a.m. to 8:55 a.m. – Panel I:

Educators, Law Enforcement, Behavioral Health & Artificial Intelligence (AI) Strategies to INTERCEPT Active Shooter Killers

  • Retired District Attorney, Matt Mangino, Lawrence County, PA
  • Allison Paolini, Assistant Professor of School Counseling, Program Director, Arkansas State University
  • T. Wilkins, Senior Vice President of Government Solutions, Zero Eyes
  • Marisa R. Randazzo, Ph.D., Director of Threat Assessment Georgetown University
  • Colonel Alvin Pollock, Broward Sheriff’s Office (BSO)

MODERATOR: James DePelisi, Director/CEO, Broward County Crime Commission

BREAK: 8:55 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

9:00 a.m. to 9:55 a.m. – Panel II:

Are Guns the Root Cause of Active Killer Events?

  • Analysis and Debate
  • John Lott, President, Crime Prevention Research Center
  • Ragy Girgis, MD, MS, Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Columbia University Department of Psychiatry and New York State Psychiatric Institute

MODERATOR: James DePelisi, Director/CEO, Broward County Crime Commission

BREAK: 9:55 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

10:00 a.m. to 10:55 a.m. – Dual Presentation:

How to Talk to Your Children about Active Killer Tragedies

  • Thomas DeMaria, National Center for School Crisis & Bereavemet
  • Robin Gurwitch, Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine

BREAK: 10:55 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

11:00 a.m. to Noon – Panel III:

Survivors of Active Shooter Attacks – Hear How They Cope and Move Forward

  • David Sallak, Citizen, Highland Park, Illinois, July 4th Shooting
  • Tony Brosio, Citizen, Highland Park, Illinois, July 4th Shooting
  • Nancy Rotering, Mayor, Highland Park, Illinois, July 4th Shooting
  • Eric Graves, Community Journalist, FOX 59 TV, Indianapolis, on Behalf of the Citizens of the Greenwood Park Mall Shooting, Indiana

MODERATOR: Ms. Sandra Welch, Vice Mayor City of Coconut Creek

About the Broward County Crime Commission:

Founded in 1976, by Proclamation of the citizenry of south Florida, the Broward County Crime Commission is one of 22 Citizen Crime Commissions in America, and the fifth oldest in the United States. Its mission is to assess and evaluate crime, and social issues which can transpire into crime, within Broward County (and the state of Florida, in general), and to work in concert with the General Public, Law Enforcement, and Criminal Justice System to derive preemptive and preventive solutions to such crimes, through Behavioral Health Analytics, Academic Programs, and Community Outreach Programs. http://www.browardcrime.org/.

About the Building Bridges Mental Health Conference Series:

The Building Bridges Mental Health Conference Series was conceived to narrow the gap, and finite the correlation between Behavioral Health issues and Crime, so that such crimes can be prevented and preempted. Since November of 2013, the Crime Commission has hosted and executed a body of work comprising more than 40 webinars and conferences, in the areas of: Active Shooter Events, Verbal De-escalation and Conflict Resolution, Narcotics Trafficking, Domestic Violence, Workplace Violence, Societal Violence, School Campus Violence, Juvenile Violence, Crimes Against Children of Autism, Hate Crime Violence, Sextortion, and Cyber Crime Ransomware Extortion. More than 7,000 people have attended these acclaimed forums; and more than 700 speakers and judges have participated. Attendees and panel participants include: Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Sociologists, Social Workers, Journalists, Law Enforcement Administrators, Judges, Criminal Justice Members, Front Line First Responders, Prosecutors, Defense Attorney’s, Doctors, Nurses, Academia, Educators, and the General Public.

TO REGISTER: www.BrowardCrime.org

MEDIA CONTACT:
Broward County Crime Commission: Tel: 754-423-1976 or 954-803-2139; Email: James@BrowardCrime.org.

MULTIMEDIA:

PHOTO link for media: https://www.Send2Press.com/300dpi/22-0923-s2p-browardcrm-300dpi.jpg

Photo Caption:  Broward County Crime Commission past panelists.

News Source: Broward County Crime Commission

To view the original post, visit: https://www.send2press.com/wire/broward-county-crime-commission-to-host-webinar-active-shooters-among-us-are-the-solutions-that-complex/.

This press release was issued by Send2Press® Newswire on behalf of the news source, who is solely responsible for its accuracy. www.send2press.com.

Source: Ross Arrowsmith

New Item: ‘We’re struggling to save lives’: Temple University Hospital employees stage picket over working conditions, low wages – WHYY

At the corner of Broad and Ontario streets in North Philadelphia, a crowd of people wearing red T-shirts and holding picket signs marched back and forth in front of Temple University Hospital.

“One, two, three, four — ” a woman shouted into a microphone.

“Safe staffing on the floor!” the crowd yelled back.

“Five, six, seven, eight — ”

“Temple must negotiate!”

Nurses at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia picketed on Broad Street during negotiations of a 3-year contract to raise awareness about issues of recruiting, retention and pay disparity, on Sept. 23, 2022. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Several hundred union nurses, health technicians, dieticians, and other workers staged an informational picket Friday to raise awareness in the community about what they call unsafe working conditions at the city’s largest general acute care hospital.

Source: Ross Arrowsmith